Аналитическое чтение учебно-методическое пособие для студентов отделения заочного обучения




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Understanding the Selection





  1. Define the selection. Present its contents in a nutshell.

  2. What is the main idea of the first selection? Why does Murphy act like an angry old man? What is the implication in the words “The foundations are tottering”?

  3. Comment on the symbolism Murphy speaks about. Do you agree that the movie industry is declining? In what way?

  4. Speak of Jess Craig and his crisis. This state is rather typical for a man in his forties. Why? What can help?

  5. What makes Craig attractive to a young girl like Gail McKinnon?

  6. Comment on the second selection. Divorce and children. Why is Ann on her father’s side? What does Craig convince her of? What stylistic means emphasize Ann’s rejection of the situation?

  7. Account for Craig’s relationships with Gail and Constance. Why does he need both women?

  8. What is the author’s attitude towards Jess Craig? How did you feel it? Compare Craig’s actual and inner speech.

  9. Sum up the characters involved in both selections. Summarize the author’s method of character drawing. Pick out verbs and adverbs characterizing Craig’s ex-wife, Ann, Murphy. Compare Gail and Ann. Why does their manner of speech make Craig uncomfortable?

  10. Summarize your observations on the vocabulary, syntax and style of the passage.

  11. How can you account for the title of the novel?



Words and Word-combinations to be memorized





  1. to do most of the talking – больше всех говорить

  2. to quiz smb – поддразнивать, подшучивать над кем-то

  3. to quit (in one’s sophomore year) – бросить (учебу) (на втором курсе)

  4. to get a job with (a radio station) – найти, получить работу на (радио)

  5. to make a pass at smb – приставать к кому-то

  6. to ramble on about smth – молоть вздор

  7. crappy – груб. паршивый

  8. where the old have got us – до чего довели нас старики

  9. guff – пустая болтовня

  10. to yell at smb – орать, кричать на кого-то

  11. quite a while ago – уже довольно давно

  12. to go one’s separate ways – жить своей жизнью, быть друг другу чужими

  13. to put a detective on smb – нанять детектива для слежки за кем-то

  14. to be an easy crier – глаза на мокром месте

  15. there is no point in doing smth – нет смысла делать что-то

  16. to be out for smb’s money – охотиться за чьими-то деньгами

  17. to get away with smth – сходить чему-то с чьих-либо рук

  18. to buy smth – поверить тому, что не является правдой; ср. купиться на что-то

  19. to have a head for business – иметь способности к бизнесу

Exercises





  1. Explain and expand on the following.

1. “I want to find out what the goddamn younger generation is about,” Murphy said, “before they come and slit my throat.” 2. “I’m not the one who invented the permissive society,” Murphy said. “They did. The goddamn young.” 3. “Look where the old have got us,” Gail McKinnon said. “The young can’t do any worse.” 4. “I don’t have any children, thank God, but I listen to my friends’ kids … They can do a lot worse.” 5. “The foundations are tottering,” Murphy grumbled. 6. “I guess it’s not the sort of thing a lady likes to talk about,” Anne said. 7. “You don’t hate her,” Craig said gently. Whatever he was responsible for, he didn’t want to be responsible for alienating his daughters from their mother. 8. “Why don’t you put a detective on her for two days and then see how she behaves?” – “I can’t do that.” 9. “Betrayal begins at home,” Craig said. “I was no angel either.” 10. “I think because I do have you two everything else is worth it and no matter what your mother does or says I am still grateful to her for that.” 11. Oh, Christ, he thought. Families. 12. They talk about revolutions devouring their young.


  1. Paraphrase the following sentences paying special attention to unconventional speech.

1. “Do all the guys you interview make a pass at you?” 2. Murphy rambled on about the decline of the movie industry. 3. “How do you like that for crappy symbolism?” 4. He was becoming belligerent with the wine. 5. “I know that song and dance,” Murphy said. 6. “The poor girl’s taken enough guff from you already.” 7. “How was your visit?” he asked carefully. – “Average gruesome,” Anne said. 8. “I got to have dinner at the Richemonde with Mummy and her friend, along with all the other goodies.” 9. “Wanna bet?” 10. “Okay,” Anne said. “I’ll buy that.”


  1. Define these words on your own. Compare your definitions with the definitions in an English - English dictionary.

Quiz (v), decline (n), symbolism (n), interview (n), totter (v), coincidence (n), adventuring (adj.).


  1. Find synonyms and synonymous expressions for the following.

To sit next to smb; ostentation; rough; every now and then; to estrange; to eat hungrily; senseless chatter; intelligent, bright; to leave; loss of strength; to endure without protest.


  1. Paraphrase these sentences using words and expressions from the text.

1. Murphy was the only person who talked at dinner. 2. She left college in her third year. 3. He was making unwelcome amorous advances at Gail. 4. It is his money she has after. 5. They didn’t divorce but separated. 6. It is very seldom that she allows herself to cry. 7. It is no use trying to talk to him. 8. I think she believed it against her better judgement. 9. He always teases her good-naturedly. 10. The boy was not punished for his bad marks.


  1. Find Russian equivalents for the following.

The foundations are tottering; the permissive society; obscurely doomed; to devour their young; to be gallant for five minutes; to sue smb for adultery; to be bored to the point of suicide; Geneva was just pure fun.

  1. Find English equivalents for these words and word-combinations.

Молоть вздор; нанять детектива; до чего старики довели нас; она даже устроила ей сцену; иметь дело с немецкими и японскими компаниями; приставать к кому-то; иметь способности к математике; сходить с рук; помпезный банкет; частично; нет смысла продолжать беседу.


  1. Explain these grammatical phenomena. Consult your book of grammar if necessary.

A) Means of logical and emotional emphasis.

1. I think because I do have you two everything else is worth it and no matter what your mother does or says I am still grateful to her for that. 2. I was no angel either. 3. I am not the one who invented the permissive society. (Give neutral variants of these sentences.)

B) Miscellaneous.

1. Look where the old have got us. (Article) 2. Sitting there, ordering caviar and yelling at the waiter about the wine and being gallant for five minutes with Mummy and five minutes with me. (ing-forms) 3. They talk about revolutions devouring their young. (Construction) 4. It’s ridiculous, she says, for you to get only five per cent on your money. (Infinitive) 5. Constance had nothing to do with my leaving your mother. (Gerundial complex)


  1. Fill in the blanks with prepositions and adverbs if necessary.

  1. 1. The woman put a detective … her husband. 2. Why are you yelling … me? 3. The old man rambled … … younger generation. 4. He kept quizzing … me at dinner. 5. Why did she quit … her third year? 6. He got a job … a bank. 7. There is no point … trying to persuade him. 8. Don’t think you’ll get … … your accusations. 9. I’m absolutely positive that the girl is … … my father’s money. 10. I’m afraid he’ll make a pass … her.

  2. “Her friend is … her, helping her … consult.” A sudden hardness came … Anne’s voice. “The American economy doesn’t look strong enough ... her, she says, she intends to go ... German and Japanese companies. She told me to tell … you you ought to do the same. It’s ridiculous, she says, … you to get only five per cent … your money. You never had a head … business, and she’s thinking … your best interests. … your best interests, she says, you also ought to give … your lady friend in Paris.”

“She told … you … that?” He tried to keep the anger … … his voice.

“She says that the lady is ridiculously young … you and looks … a manicurist and is … … your money. She’s even had a scene … her. She told the lady what she thought … adventuring ladies who took advantage ... foolish old men and broke … happy homes.”

Craig shook … his head wonderingly. “Constance never said a word … it.”


  1. Fill in the blanks with articles if necessary.

He reached for … letter from his lawyer, then thought better of it. He picked up … batch of ... yellow sheets, weighed them, held them indecisively over … wastebasket. He shuffled through … pages at random. “He is forty-eight now and looks it,” he read. What does … forty-eight-year-old man look like to … twenty-two-year-old girl? Ruins. … walls of … Pompeii. … trenches of Verdun. … Hiroshima.

He sat down at … desk, started reading from where he had left off when … girl had gone out of … room. See yourself as … world sees you.

“He does not seem like … self-indulgent man,” he read. “And according to all reports he does not indulge … others.”

“Because of this, in some quarters he has … reputation for … ruthlessness. He has made many enemies and among his former collaborators there are some who speak of what they call his disloyalty. In support of this, it is cited that only once has he ever done more than one play by … same author, and unlike other producers has never developed …favorite roster of actors. It must be admitted that when his last two films failed, for … total loss that is estimated at more than eight million dollars, there was little sympathy shown him in … movie colony.”

… bitch, he thought, where did she get that?


  1. Translate into English.

1. Почему ты не нанял детектива, чтобы следить за ней? 2. Не думай, что я тебе поверю. Это пустая болтовня. 3. Я хочу знать, куда нас заведут подобные эксперименты. 4. “Я тоже далеко не ангел”, – сказал Крэг. 5. “Не я придумал общество вседозволенности”, – проворчал Мёрф. 6. Почему она бросила университет на втором курсе? 7. У неё глаза никогда не были на мокром месте. 8. Она всего лишь охотится за его деньгами. 9. Такие вещи никому не должны сходить с рук, мы не потерпим этого. 10. Уже довольно давно у каждого из них своя жизнь. 11. У меня никогда не было способностей к музыке. 12. В твоих интересах порвать с этой женщиной. 13. Нет смысла продолжать жить вместе. 14. Под свои деньги он получал всего пять процентов. 15. Говорят, что революция всегда пожирает своих детей. 16. Все парни, у которых ты берешь интервью, пристают к тебе? 17. Мёрфи продолжал молоть вздор об упадке киноиндустрии. 18. Он нашел хорошую работу в нефтяной компании. 19. Обычно она больше всех говорит и больше всех ест. 20. У него репутация безжалостного человека.


  1. Comment on the excerpt from the Russian translation of “Evening in Byzantium”. Use it for simultaneous back translation into English. Work in pairs.

Они обедали в гостиничном коттедже. Холодный лангуст был очень хорош, и Мёрфи заказал две бутылки белого вина. Он больше всех пил и больше всех говорил. Он поддразнивал Гейл МакКиннон грубовато, но добродушно, во всяком случае, вначале. “Я хочу выяснить, что на уме у этой чертовой молодежи”, – говорил он, – “пока они не пришли и не перерезали мне горло”.

Гейл отвечала на его вопросы прямо. Она была какой угодно, только не застенчивой. Выросла она в Филадельфии. Её отец и сейчас живет там. Она – единственный ребенок. Родители разведены. Отец женился во второй раз. Он – юрист. Она училась в Брин Морском университете, но на втором курсе бросила. Нашла работу на одной из радиостанций Филадельфии и полтора года пробыла в Европе. Постоянным местом жительства был Лондон, но работа давала возможность много путешествовать. Европа ей нравится, но она намерена вернуться назад и жить в Штатах. Желательно, в Нью-Йорк.

Она была похожа на тысячи других американских девушек, которых Крэг встречал в Европе, полных надежд, энтузиазма, и судьба которых могла сложиться как угодно.

“У вас есть друг?” – спросил Мёрфи.

“В общем, нет”, – ответила она.

“Любовники?”

Девушка рассмеялась.

“Мёрф”, – с упреком сказала Соня Мёрфи.

“Это не я придумал общество вседозволенности”, – сказал Мёрфи. – “Они. Чертова молодежь”. Он опять обратился к девушке. “А что, все парни, у которых вы берете интервью, пристают к вам?”

“Не все”, – сказала она с улыбкой. “Самым интересным был один старый раввин из Кливленда, который летел через Лондон в Иерусалим. Мне пришлось защищать свою жизнь в отеле Беркли. К счастью, его самолет улетал через час. У него была шелковистая борода”.

  1. A) Find the stylistic devices within the following sentences and analyze their function.

1. They talk about revolutions devouring their young. 2. “I suppose you approve, Miss Smart-Face.” He was becoming belligerent with the wine. 3. I had to fight for my life in the Hotel Berkeley. 4. Sitting there, ordering caviar and yelling at the waiter about the wine and being gallant for five minutes with Mummy and five minutes with me.

B) Find all epithets, metaphors and metaphoric idioms in the text. How do they characterize Anne’s speech?


Long Day’s Journey into Night” by Eugene O’Neill


E. (Gladstone) O’Neill is an American dramatist (1888-1953). He achieved recognition with his first, full-length play “Beyond the Horizon” (1920), which won a Pulitzer Prize. Among his many other plays are “The Dreamy Kid” (1916), “Desire under the Elms” (1924), “Mourning Becomes Electra” (1931) etc. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature in 1936.

Long Day’s Journey into Night” was performed and published posthumously in 1956. It is a semiautobiographical tragedy portraying mutually destructive family relationships. Games Tyrone is an ex-actor. After the birth of their latest baby his wife Mary was put on drugs by an ignorant hotel doctor. Their younger son Edmund has got TB. Now they all face up to the tragedy in attempt to blame and to forgive each other.


____________________


T Y R O N E: Mary! (He suddenly hugs her to him – brokenly.) Dear Mary! For the love of God, for my sake and the boys’ sake and your own, won’t you stop now?

M A R Y: (Stammers in guilty confusion for a second) I – James! Please! (Her strange, stubborn defense comes back instantly.) Stop what? What are you talking about? (He lets his arm fall to his side brokenly. She impulsively puts her arm around him.) James! We’ve loved each other! We always will! Let’s remember only that, and not try to understand what we cannot understand, or help things that cannot be helped – the things life has done to us we cannot excuse or explain.

T Y R O N E: (As if he hadn’t heard – bitterly.) You won’t even try?

M A R Y: (Her arms drop hopelessly and she turns away – with detachment.) Try to go for a drive this afternoon, you mean? Why, yes, if you wish me to, although it makes me feel lonelier if I stayed here. There is no one I can invite to drive with me, and I never know where to tell Smythe to go. If there was a friend’s house where I could drop in and laugh and gossip awhile. But, of course, there isn’t. There never has been. (Her manner becoming more and more remote) At the Convent I had so many friends. Girls whose families lived in lovely homes. I used to visit them and they’d visit me in my father’s home. But, naturally, after I married an actor – you know how actors were considered in those days – a lot of them gave me the cold shoulder. And then, right after we were married, there was the scandal of that woman who had been your mistress, suing you. From then on, all my old friends either pitied me or cut me dead. I hated the ones who cut me much less than the pitiers.

T Y R O N E: (With guilty resentment) For God’s sake, don’t dig up what’s long forgotten. If you’re that far gone in the past already, when it’s only the beginning of the afternoon, what will you be tonight?

M A R Y: (Stares at him defiantly now) Come to think of it, I do have to drive uptown. There’s something I must get at the drugstore.

T Y R O N E: (Bitterly scornful) Leave it to you to have some of the stuff hidden, and prescriptions for more! I hope you’ll lay in a good stock ahead so we’ll never have another night like the one when you screamed for it, and ran out of the house in your nightdress half crazy, to try and throw yourself off the dock!

M A R Y: (Tries to ignore this) I have to get tooth powder and toilet soap and cold cream – (She breaks down pitiably.) James! You mustn’t remember! You mustn’t humiliate me so!

T Y R O N E: (Ashamed) I’m sorry. Forgive me, Marry!

M A R Y: (Defensively detached again) It doesn’t matter. Nothing like that ever happened. You must have dreamed it. (He stares at her hopelessly. Her voice seems to drift farther and farther away.) I was so healthy before Edmund was born. You remember, James. There wasn’t a nerve in my body. Even traveling with you season after season, with week after week of one-night stands, in trains without Pullmans, in dirty rooms of filthy hotels, eating bad food, bearing children in hotel rooms, I still kept healthy. But bearing Edmund was the last straw. I was so sick afterwards, and that ignorant quack of a cheap hotel doctor – All he knew was I was in pain. It was easy for him to stop the pain.

T Y R O N E: Mary! For God’s sake, forget the past!

M A R Y: (With strange objective calm) Why? How can I? The past is the present, isn’t it? It’s the future, too. We all try to lie out of that but life won’t let us. (Going on) I blame only myself. I swore after Eugene died I would never have another baby. I was to blame for his death. If I hadn’t left him with my mother to join you on the road, because you wrote telling me you missed me and were so lonely, Jamie would never have been allowed, when he still had measles, to go in the baby’s room. (Her face hardening) I’ve always believed Jamie did it on purpose. He was jealous of the baby. He hated him. (As TYRONE starts to protest.) Oh, I know Jamie was only seven, but he was never stupid. He’d been warned it might kill the baby. He knew. I’ve never been able to forgive him for that.

T Y R O N E: (With bitter sadness) Are you back with Eugene now? Can’t you let our dead baby rest in peace?

M A R Y: (As if she hadn’t heard him) It was my fault. I should have insisted on staying with Eugene and not have let you persuade me to join you, just because I loved you. Above all, I shouldn’t have let you insist I have another baby to take Eugene’s place, because you thought that would make me forget his death. I knew from experience by then that children should have homes to be born in, if they are to be good children, and women need homes, if they are to be good mothers. I was afraid all the time I carried Edmund. I knew something terrible would happen. I knew I’d proved by the way I’d left Eugene that I wasn’t worthy to have another baby, and that God would punish me if I did. I never should have borne Edmund.

T Y R O N E: (With an uneasy glance through the front parlor) Mary! Be careful with your talk. If he heard you he might think you never wanted him. He’s feeling bad enough already without –

M A R Y: (Violently) It’s a lie! I did want him! More than anything in the world! You don’t understand! I meant, for his sake. He has never been happy. He never will be. Nor healthy. He was born nervous and too sensitive, and that’s my fault. And now, ever since he’s been so sick I’ve kept remembering Eugene and my father and I’ve been so frightened and guilty – (Then, catching herself, with an instant change to stubborn denial) Oh, I know it’s foolish to imagine dreadful things when there’s no reason for it. After all, everyone has colds and gets over them.


(TYRONE stares at her and sighs helplessly. He turns away toward the front parlor and sees EDMUND coming down the stairs in the hall.)


T Y R O N E: (Sharply, in a low voice) Here’s Edmund. For God’s sake try and be yourself – at least until he goes! You can do that much for him! (He waits, forcing his face into a pleasantly paternal expression. She waits frightenedly seized again by a nervous panic, her hands fluttering over the bosom of her dress, up to her throat and hair, with a distracted aimlessness. Then, as EDMUND approaches the doorway, she cannot face him. She goes swiftly away to the windows at left and stares out with her back to the front parlor. EDMUND enters. He has changed to a ready-made blue serge suit, high stiff collar and tie, black shoes. With an actor’s heartiness.) Well! You look spic and span. I’m on my way up to change, too.


(He starts to pass him.)


E D M U N D: (Dryly) Wait a minute, Papa. I hate to bring up disagreeable topics, but there’s the matter of carfare. I’m broke.

T Y R O N E: (Starts automatically on a customary lecture.) You’ll always be broke until you learn the value – (Checks himself guiltily, looking at his son’s sick face with worried pity) But you’ve been learning, lad. You worked hard before you took ill. You’ve done splendidly. I’m proud of you. (He pulls out a small roll of bills from his pants pocket and carefully selects one. EDMUND takes it. He glances at it and his face expresses astonishment. His father again reacts customarily – sarcastically.) Thank you. (He quotes.) “How sharper than a serpent’s tooth it is – “

E D M U N D: “To have a thankless child.” I know. Give me a chance, Papa. I’m knocked speechless. This isn’t a dollar. It’s a ten spot.

T Y R O N E: (Embarrassed by his generosity) Put it in your pocket. You’ll probably meet some of your friends uptown and you can’t hold your end up and be sociable with nothing in your jeans.

E D M U N D: You meant it? Gosh, thank you, Papa. (He is genuinely pleased and grateful for a moment – then he stares at his father’s face with uneasy suspicion.) But why all of a sudden – ? (Cynically) Did Doc Hardy tell you I was going to die? (Then he sees his father is bitterly hurt.) No! That’s a rotten crack. I was only kidding, Papa. (He puts an arm around his father impulsively and gives him an affectionate hug.) I’m very grateful. Honest, Papa.

T Y R O N E: (Touched, returns his hug.) You’re welcome, lad.

M A R Y: (Suddenly turns to them in a confused panic of frightened anger) I won’t have it! (She stamps her foot.) Do you hear, Edmund! Such morbid nonsense! Saying you’re going to die! It’s the books you read! Nothing but sadness and death! Your father shouldn’t allow you to have them. And some of the poems you’ve written yourself are even worse! You’d think you didn’t want to live! A boy of your age with everything before him! It’s just a pose you get out of books! You’re not really sick at all!

T Y R O N E: Mary! Hold your tongue!

M A R Y: (Instantly changing to a detached tone) But, James, it’s absurd of Edmund to be so gloomy and make such a great to-do about nothing. (Turning to EDMUND but avoiding his eyes – teasingly affectionate) Never mind, dear. I’m on to you. (She comes to him.) You want to be petted and spoiled and made a fuss over, isn’t that it? You’re still such a baby. (She puts her arm around him and hugs him. He remains rigid and unyielding. Her voice begins to tremble.) But please don’t carry it too far, dear. Don’t say horrible things. I know it’s foolish to take them seriously but I can’t help it. You’ve got me – so frightened.


(She breaks and hides her face on his shoulder, sobbing. EDMUND is moved in spite of himself. He pats her shoulder with an awkward tenderness.)


E D M U N D: Don’t, mother.


Commentary


  1. Pulitzer Prize – Пулитцеровская премия. Утверждена Джозефом Пулитцером, американским газетным магнатом венгерского происхождения. Присуждается ежегодно американским гражданам за достижения в музыке, журналистике, истории Америки, поэзии, драматургии, художественной литературе.

  2. “How sharper than a serpent’s tooth it is to have a thankless child.” – Больней, чем быть укушенным змеей, иметь неблагодарного ребенка. Слова короля Лира из одноименной трагедии Шекспира (Акт I, сцена 4; пер. Б. Пастернака).

  3. I’m knocked speechless – я совершенно обалдел, не нахожу слов.

  4. a ten spot (разг.) – десятка

  5. you can’t hold your end up – зд. ты не можешь быть с ними на равных

  6. I’m on to you. – зд. Я тебя насквозь вижу.

  7. one-night stand – третьеразрядная гостиница, где актеры останавливаются на одну ночь

Understanding the Selection


  1. Define the selection as a form of writing and present its contents in a nutshell.

  2. Speak on two time dimensions the narration touches upon.

  3. Comment on the first paragraph. What implication does it carry? How does it colour the whole of the selected passage?

  4. Mary’s utterances are more extensive than those of Tyrone. Why? Why is Mary so engrossed in the past?

  5. Why do characters switch rapidly from one tone to another?

  6. Account for the role of the author’s stage directions. Why are they so precise and detailed?

  7. Comment on Mary’s syntax. What grammatical structures are prevailing in her speech? Why? What other means of emotional colouring can you single out in Mary’s utterances?

  8. Tyrone: a character sketch. The writer’s method in presenting this character.

  9. Judging from what you have read what do you think is the author’s attitude towards his characters? How do you feel it? Bear in mind that the play is autobiographical.

  10. Speak on the problem of drug addiction. Take into account all aspects of the problem.



Words and Word-combinations to be memorized





  1. to help things / cannot help things – изменить / нельзя изменить что-то

  2. to drop in on smb – зайти к кому-то

  3. from then on – с тех пор; ср. from now on – с этих пор

  4. come to think of it – если задуматься над чем-то …

  5. to lay in smth ahead – отложить про запас

  6. to do smth on purpose – сделать что-то нарочно

  7. to do that much for smb – хоть это сделать для кого-то

  8. to look spic and span – шикарно выглядеть, быть одетым с иголочки

  9. to bring up a topic – поднять тему, затеять разговор на тему

  10. to be broke – быть без денег

  11. to be sociable – общаться, быть общительным, syn. to socialize with smb

  12. to make a fuss over smb – суетиться над кем-то

  13. to carry it too far – зайти слишком далеко

  14. to be on one’s way up to do smth – идти делать что-то; ср. I’m on my way up to change. – Пойду, переоденусь.

  15. to give smb a cold shoulder – холодно относиться к кому-то



Exercises





  1. Explain and expand on the following.

1. “We loved each other! We always will! Let’s remember only that, and not try to understand what we cannot understand, or help things that cannot be helped.” 2. “But, naturally, after I married an actor – you know how actors were considered in those days – a lot of them gave me the cold shoulder.” 3. “I hated the ones who cut me much less than the pitiers.” 4. “If you are that far gone in the past already, when it’s only the beginning of the afternoon, what will you be tonight?” 5. “The past is the present, isn’t it? It’s the future too. We all try to lie out of that but life won’t let us.” 6. “I’ve always believed Jamie did it on purpose. He was jealous of the baby.” 7. “I knew from experience by then that children should have homes to be born in, if they are to be good children, and women need homes, if they are to be good mothers.” 8. Starts automatically on a customary lecture. (Tyrone) 9. Embarrassed by his generosity. (Tyrone)


  1. Paraphrase the following sentences from the selection paying attention to colloquialisms.

1. “For God’s sake, don’t dig up what’s long forgotten.” 2. “I was so sick afterwards, and that ignorant quack of a cheap hotel doctor …” 3. “I hate to bring up disagreeable topics, but there’s the matter of carfare. I’m broke.” 4. “I’m knocked speechless.” 5. “You’ll probably meet some of your friends uptown and you can’t hold your end up and be sociable with nothing in your jeans.” 6. “That’s a rotten crack. I was only kidding, Papa.” 7. “But James, it’s absurd of Edmund to be so gloomy and to make such a great to-do about nothing.” 8. “Never mind, dear. I’m on to you.”


  1. Explain the meaning of these words using an English - English dictionary.

Confusion, detachment, guilt, sarcastically, remote, resentment, bitter, violently, stubborn, affection, automatically, customary, quote.

  1. Find synonyms for these words and explain the difference in their meaning and use.

To hug; scornful; to scream; on purpose; to persuade smb; swiftly; to check oneself; genuinely; morbid; sociable; astonishment; filthy.


  1. Paraphrase these sentences using words and expressions from the text.

1. I believe James did it deliberately. 2. He lost all his money gambling. 3. She is friendly and fun to have around, people like her a lot. 4. His suit looks clean and bright, like new. 5. All my old friends interrupted our friendship. 6. She always looks so impartial and estranged. 7. He is not a good or professional doctor, don’t trust him. 8. It is anger and bitterness that Tyrone speaks with. 9. Trust him to start an unpleasant talk at the wrong moment. 10. For a moment Edmund was at a loss for words. 11. Aunt Mary always pays a lot of unnecessary attention to the children. 12. You drink a lot. Stop it before it’s too late. 13. He often uses expressions which clearly mean the opposite to what is felt. 14. His tone was full of sorrow and anger. 15. She could always see through his true feelings and intentions.

  1. Find Russian equivalents for the following.

To help things that cannot be helped; with guilty resentment; defiantly; detachment; quack of a doctor; to drift father away; unyielding; a rotten crack; morbid nonsense; bitterly scornful.

  1. Find English equivalents for these word collocations.

Выглядеть с иголочки; шарлатан; смущенный своей щедростью; привычно реагировать; с актерской тщательностью; перестать кого-то замечать; поехать в город; подать на кого-то в суд; с горьким презрением.

  1. Express the same notion more concisely.

A person dishonestly claiming to have medical knowledge or skills; not influenced by personal feelings; to make smb feel low or lose respect of others; the last trial which makes one collapse; determined, showing a strong will; filled with or caused by anger or sorrow; fond of being with other people friendly; showing strong angry disrespect; a clever quick joke or remark; seeing little or no good in anything.

  1. Explain different applications of the italicized words.

1. Edmund was dressed with an actor’s heartiness. We thanked the hostess for her kind words and heartiness. 2. Mary instantly changed to a detached tone. They live in a detached house. 3. He’s always making cracks about my big feet. The door was opened just a crack. 4. And then there was the scandal of that woman who had been your mistress, suing you. She felt she was no longer mistress in her own house when her husband’s mother came to stay. 5. Nothing like that ever happened. You must have dreamed it. He always dreamed about playing football for his country.


  1. Analyze these grammatical phenomena (miscellaneous). Consult your book of grammar if necessary. Translate the sentences into Russian.

1. Try to go for a drive this afternoon, you mean? Why, yes, if you wish me to, although it makes me feel lonelier if I stayed here. (Non-finite forms) 2. Come to think of it, I do have to drive uptown. (Auxiliary verb) 3. Nothing like that ever happened. You must have dreamed it. (Non-finite forms) 4. If I hadn’t left him with my mother to join you on the road, Jamie would never have been allowed, when he still had measles, to go in the baby’s room. (Mood) 5. I should have insisted on staying with Eugene and not have let you persuade me to join you. (Non-finite forms) 6. I knew from experience by then that children should have homes to be born in, if they are to be good children, and women need homes, if they are to be good mothers. (Means of expressing modality) 7. It’s a lie! I did want him! (Auxiliary verb) 8. She waits frightenedly seized again by a nervous panic, her hands fluttering over the bosom of her dress, up to her throat and hair. (Non-finite forms)

  1. Fill in the blanks with prepositions or adverbs if necessary.

E D M U N D: Shove … the bottle. I’ll have one, too.

J A M I E: (With sudden, big-brotherly solicitude, grabbing the bottle) No, you don’t. Not while I’m … . Remember doctor’s orders. Maybe no one else gives a damn if you die, but I do. My kid brother. I love your guts, Kid. Everything else is gone. You’re all I’ve got left. (Pulling bottle close to him) So no booze … you, if I can help it.

E D M U N D: (Irritably) Oh, lay … it.

J A M I E: (Is hurt and his face hardens) You don’t believe I care, eh? Just drunken bull. (He shoves the bottle over.) All right. Go … and kill yourself.

E D M U N D: (Seeing he is hurt – affectionately) Sure I know you care, Jamie, and I’m going … the wagon. But tonight doesn’t count. Too many damned things have happened today. (He pours a drink.) Here’s how.

J A M I E: (Sobers up momentarily and with a pitying look) I know, Kid. It’s been a lousy day … you. (Then with sneering cynicism) I’ll bet old Gaspard hasn’t tried to keep you … booze. Probably give … you a case to take with you to the state farm for pauper patients. The sooner you kick the bucket, the less expense. (With contemptuous hatred) What bastard to have … a father! Christ, if you put him … a book, no one would believe … it!

E D M U N D: (Defensively) Oh, Papa’s all right, if you try to understand him – and keep your sense … humor.

J A M I E: (Cynically) He’s been putting … the old sob act for you, eh? He can always kid you. But not me. Never again. (Then slowly) Although, … a way, I do feel sorry … him … one thing. But he has even that coming … him. He’s … blame. (Hurriedly) But to hell … that. (He grabs the bottle and pours another drink, appearing very drunk again.) That lash drink’s getting me. This one ought to put the lights … . Did you tell … Gaspard I got it … … Doc Hardy this sanatorium is a charity dump?

E D M U N D: (Reluctantly) Yes. I told … him I wouldn’t go there. It’s all settled now. He said I can go anywhere I want. (He adds, smiling without resentment.) … reason, of course.

(from “Long Day’s Journey into Night” by E. O’Neill)


  1. Fill in the blanks with articles if necessary.

At a rear are two double doorways with … portieres. The one at right leads into … front parlor with … formally arranged, set appearance of … room rarely occupied. … other opens on … dark, windowless back parlor, never used except as … passage from living room to dining room. Against … wall between … doorways is … small bookcase, with … picture of Shakespeare above it, containing … novels by Balzac, Zola, philosophical and sociological works by Nietzsche, Marx, etc.

In … right wall, rear, is … screen door leading out on … porch which extends halfway around … house. Farther forward, … series of three windows looks over … front lawn to … harbor and … avenue that runs along … water front. … small wicker table and … ordinary oak desk are against … wall, flanking … windows.

In … left wall, … similar series of windows looks out on … grounds in back of … house. Farther back is … large, glassed-in bookcase with sets of Dumas, Victor Hugo, … World’s Best Literature in fifty large volumes, Hume’s History of … England, etc. … astonishing thing about these sets is that all … volumes have … look of having been read and reread.

(from “Long Day’s Journey into Night” by E. O’Neill)


  1. Translate into English.

1. Не нужно пытаться понять то, что нельзя понять или изменить то, что нельзя изменить. 2. Ах, если бы был такой дом, куда я могла бы зайти, посмеяться или посплетничать немножко. 3. С тех самых пор моих старых друзей как отрезало. 4. Если подумать, то мне действительно нужно съездить в город. 5. Отложи про запас немного денег, чтобы нам не пришлось экономить. 6. Я всегда думала, что Джейми нарочно вошел в комнату младенца, когда болел корью. 7. Подожди, папа! Не люблю затрагивать неприятные темы, но у меня совсем нет денег. 8. Посмотрите, он одет с иголочки! 9. С ней легко иметь дело, она очень общительная. 10. Хоть это он мог сделать для своей семьи? 11. Твои шутки заходят слишком далеко. 12. Ты шикарно выглядишь. Пойду, тоже переоденусь. 13. Она всегда суетится без причины.


  1. A) Choose the stylistic device, which is used in the following sentences. Underline it in the sentences. Account for your choice.




    1. But, naturally, after I married an actor – you know how actors were considered in those days – a lot of them gave me the cold shoulder.

a) simile b) metaphor c) detached construction


    1. There wasn’t a nerve in my body.

a) periphrasis b) irony c) hyperbole


    1. I was so sick afterwards, and that ignorant quack of a cheap hotel doctor – All he knew was I was in pain.

a) reversed epithet b) metonymy c) zeugma


    1. The past is the present, isn’t it? It’s the future, too.

a) ellipsis b) oxymoron c) paradox


    1. I knew from experience by then that children should have homes to be born in, if they are to be good children, and women need homes, if they are to be good mothers.

a) epifora b) antithesis c) parallel constructions

    1. “How sharper than a serpent’s tooth it is to have a thankless child.”

a) irony b) allusion c) anaphora


    1. You meant it? Gosh, thank you, Papa.

a) metonymy b) simile c) interjection


B) Find all cases of anaphora and climax. Analyze their function in the selection.


  1. Comment on the excerpt from the Russian translation of “Long Day’s Journey into Night”. Use it for simultaneous back translation into English. Work in pairs.


Т А Й Р О Н: Мэри! (Внезапно прижимает её к себе – прерывисто.) Дорогая! Ради Бога, ради меня, ради мальчиков, ради самой себя – остановись!

М Э Р И: (секунду виновато заикается) Я – Джеймс! Пожалуйста! (Но сразу же упорно и, непонятным образом, защищаясь) В чем остановиться? О чем ты говоришь? (Руки его беспомощно опускаются. Она порывисто обнимает его.) Джеймс! Мы любили друг друга! И всегда будем любить! Давай помнить только об этом и не пытаться понять то, что нельзя понять или изменить то, что невозможно изменить – то, что сделала с нами жизнь, нельзя оправдать или объяснить.

Т А Й Р О Н: (горько, как будто не слыша её) Ты даже не попытаешься?

М Э Р И: (Руки её беспомощно падают и она отворачивается – отчужденно) Съездить сегодня в город, ты хочешь сказать? Ну да, если ты хочешь, здесь я чувствую себя еще более одинокой. Некого пригласить покататься со мной, и вечно я не знаю, куда Смиту ехать. Если бы я могла зайти в дом к каким-нибудь друзьям, посмеяться или посплетничать немножко. Но, такого, конечно, нет. Никогда не было. (Она ведет себя все более отчужденно) В монастыре у меня было столько друзей. Девочки, чьи семьи жили в прекрасных домах. Я часто навещала их, а они навещали меня в отцовском доме. Но, естественно, после того, как я вышла замуж за актера – ты знаешь, как относились к актерам в те дни – многие из них отвернулись от меня. А потом, сразу после нашей свадьбы, был ещё скандал с той женщиной, которая была твоей любовницей и подала на тебя в суд. С тех самых пор все мои старые друзья или жалели меня, или же резко отвернулись. Тех, кто порвал со мной, я ненавидела меньше, чем жалеющих.

Т А Й Р О Н: (виновато обиженно) Ради Бога, не копайся ты в том, что давно забыто. Если ты так погрузилась в прошлое уже в начале дня, что с тобой будет к вечеру?

М Э Р И: (теперь смотрит на него вызывающе) Если подумать, то мне и правда нужно в город. Кое-что купить в аптеке.

Т А Й Р О Н: (с горьким презрением) Ты уж не забудешь запастись этой дурью да ещё и рецептами! Надеюсь, ты отложишь достаточно, чтобы не повторилась та ночь, когда ты, полубезумная, в ночной сорочке убежала из дома и чуть не бросилась с пристани в море.

М Э Р И: (пытаясь игнорировать это) Мне нужен зубной порошок, туалетное мыло, еще крем – (жалобно срывается). Джеймс! Ты не должен об этом вспоминать! Не должен так унижать меня!

Т А Й Р О Н: (пристыжено) Извини. Прости меня, Мэри!


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